About

SeeKenya exists to reduce blindness and provide specialist treatment and eye care services to marginalised communities within Kenya.

Queuing to be seen at the clinic in Samburu

Queuing to be seen at the clinic in Samburu

With the vast majority of Kenyans living without access to eye care, there is a desperate need for help. Working with our local church partners we are setting up a clinic to provide ongoing eye care for people living within the very poor regions of Meru and Samburu situated north of Nairobi.

Choosing glasses to restore sight

Choosing glasses to restore sight

The medical team at this clinic will be able to provide – on an ongoing basis – all forms of eye care. From readymade reading spectacles, to prescription spectacles made on site, the provision of drops for the treatment of trachoma (the leading cause of blindness in children) and treatments for allergies. We will also be referring patients for further treatment who are suffering with loss of sight from cataracts, glaucoma and other more serious eye conditions. The long term vision for SeeKenya is to provide all these services under one roof in a purpose built facility which is in the process of being completed.

History

The work of SeeKenya is led by Pete and Rachel Marson. After an initial visit to Kenya in 2010, Pete was deeply affected by what he saw – the widespread poverty and people not having access to eye care. Following the trip, Pete made a decision to use his skills as a professional optometrist to lead teams of volunteers to help the poorest communities in Kenya.

SeeKenya became a registered charity in May 2013.

Joy at being able to see properly using a pair of glasses fitted by the SeeKenya team

Joy at being able to see properly using a pair of glasses fitted by the SeeKenya team

Profile

Pete and Rachel Marson began their work with SeeKenya back in 2010. They volunteer their time to take teams to help the poorest communities around Nairobi, Meru and Samburu. Another team has just returned from Kenya where hundreds people were treated.

Pete and Rachel Marson have been married for 24 years, and have three children.

Peter and Rachel’s son Sam helping with an eye examination in the clinic in Meru

Peter and Rachel’s son Sam helping with an eye examination in the clinic in Meru

Pete has a Degree in Optometry and Visual Science, and has worked as an Optometrist since 1989. He became self-employed in 1996, and in 1998 he opened two practices, in Brighton and Hove, where he currently works.

Pete has also been working for five years in the macular department of Brighton and Hove PCT Eye Hospital, in triaging and aftercare, with local opticians and doctors referring patients to him.

Rachel has worked with disabled children, and children with challenging behaviour, and is a trained midwife.

Pete and Rachel are members of The King’s Church Mid Sussex and see their work with SeeKenya as an important part of their Christian faith.

Pete and his family travelled out again in May 2013, with the specific aim of developing partnerships with other ophthalmologists, healthcare professionals and other NGO’s based in Kenya. Pete and Rachel also met with the Kenyan Minister for health overseeing Ophthalmology Dr Michael Gichangi who is keen to support the work of SeeKenya.

Pete and Rachel meeting Dr Gichangi

Pete and Rachel meeting Dr Gichangi

The Vision

SeeKenya exists to reduce blindness and provide specialist treatment and eye care services to marginalised communities within Kenya.

With the vast majority of Kenyans living without access to eye care, there is a desperate need for help. SeeKenya aims to establish eye-care clinics in areas of need and then to replicate this work in other areas.

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With your help we can tackle avoidable blindness and give communities a better future. Please become a partner today.

The Issue

Sadly over 3 million people are classified as blind simply because they do not have access to a pair of glasses. This seriously affects their livelihood and their ability to live and support their families.

Statistically women are at a higher risk of becoming visually impaired but men are twice as likely to require eye-care services.

Young boy Philip receiving a vital eye test to help him see

Young boy Philip receiving a vital eye test to help him see

There are currently 10,000 blind children in Kenya – many who could have been treated with simple drops that cost pence.

The impact of avoidable blindness

Avoidable blindness is an issue that affects the whole community. For many, going blind can mean the end of their education, job, livelihood and independence. They will be less able to provide for their families and the communities that support them.

By building relationships with local people we aim to help educate local communities about the importance of eye health especially in children. Poor eye sight, let alone blindness, impacts a child’s ability to read a chalkboard or book and, therefore, has a huge impact on their education. By using basic eye drops, 40% of the causes of childhood blindness are preventable or treatable.